Monday, April 24, 2017

Heavy precipitation speeds carbon exchange in tropics

New insight into how forests globally will respond to long-term climate change has been gained by recent research. The new work suggests that climate-change driven increases in rainfall in warm, wet forests are likely to cause increased plant growth. Plant-growth declines are still expected in cooler forests with increased precipitation.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pZgE7X
via IFTTT

Researchers invent process to make sustainable rubber, plastics

Synthetic rubber and plastics -- used for manufacturing tires, toys and myriad other products -- are produced from butadiene, a molecule traditionally made from petroleum or natural gas. But those humanmade materials could get a lot greener soon, thanks to a team of scientists that has invented a process to make butadiene from renewable sources.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pbunFW
via IFTTT

Researchers develop eco-friendly, 4-in-1 catalyst

Performing multiple reactions in one shot reduces raw material needs and byproduct waste, a potential step toward a greener chemical industry. Researchers have developed a nanocatalyst that can perform the four reactions needed to produce a compound potentially useful in a variety of pharmaceuticals.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pYU5jZ
via IFTTT

West Virginia groundwater not affected by fracking, but surface water is

Three years of fracking has not contaminated groundwater in northwestern West Virginia, but accidental spills of wastewater from fracked wells may pose a threat to surface water, according to a new study. The scientists used a broad suite of geochemical and isotopic tracers to sample for contaminants in 112 water wells near shale gas sites, including 20 wells that were sampled both before and after fracking began.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oFyo4g
via IFTTT

Next-generation microscopy

A novel microscopy method allows unprecedented insights into the spatial organization and direct interactions of immune cells within blood and liquid multi-lineage tissues. The assay, called 'Pharmacoscopy,' is able to determine the immunomodulatory properties of drugs within large libraries on immune cells in high resolution and high throughput, enabling new possibilities for drug discovery, particularly in cancer immunotherapy, personalized medicine, and research on signaling pathways of the immune system.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pYEkcD
via IFTTT

From abundant hydrocarbons to rare spin liquids

Fuel such as gasoline is made up of hydrocarbons -- a family of molecules consisting entirely of carbon and hydrogen. Pigment and dye, coal and tar are made up of hydrocarbons too. These common, abundant materials, sometimes even associated with waste, are not often thought of as being electronically or magnetically interesting. But now scientists have made a significant find.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pYw24m
via IFTTT

Freezing lithium batteries may make them safer, bendable

A new method that could lead to lithium batteries that are safer, have longer battery life, and are bendable has now been developed, providing new possibilities such as flexible smartphones. His new technique uses ice-templating to control the structure of the solid electrolyte for lithium batteries that are used in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and grid-level energy storage.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2onCRwo
via IFTTT

Protein structure: Game-changing PanDDA method unveils previously hidden 3-D structure data

Scientists have developed a new method to extract previously hidden information from the X-ray diffraction data that are measured when resolving the three-dimensional (3-D) atomic structures of proteins and other biological molecules.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pd1GdW
via IFTTT

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Molecular libraries for organic light-emitting diodes

Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are promising candidates for flexible flat displays. By means of a screening process, it is now possible to identify more quickly lead structures with superior luminescence and charge-transport properties.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pVfB93
via IFTTT

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2ofhOwg
via IFTTT

Friday, April 21, 2017

Two-dimensional melting of hard spheres experimentally unravelled after 60 years

Experimental evidence of melting in two-dimensional substances has finally been gained by researchers. Findings from the study could be used to support technological improvements to thin film materials such as graphene.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2odL9qz
via IFTTT

New method to create the next fuel-efficient renewable energy developed

The fossil fuel fight goes on for scientists as they develop a new method for creating reversible hydrogen storage based on methanol, with no carbon emissions, in the last major paper co-authored by USC's first Nobel laureate, the late George Olah.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pmh88t
via IFTTT

Scientist's new approach may accelerate design of high-power batteries

A model for designing novel materials used in electrical storage devices, such as car batteries and capacitors, has now been designed by researchers. This approach may dramatically accelerate discovery of new materials that provide cheap and efficient ways to store energy.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2p34Ali
via IFTTT

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Making batteries from waste glass bottles

Researchers have used waste glass bottles and a low-cost chemical process to create nanosilicon anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries. The batteries will extend the range of electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and provide more power with fewer charges to personal electronics like cell phones and laptops.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pJeEho
via IFTTT

New microscopy method breaks color barrier of optical imaging

A significant step has been made toward breaking the so-called 'color barrier' of light microscopy for biological systems, allowing for much more comprehensive, system-wide labeling and imaging of a greater number of biomolecules in living cells and tissues than is currently attainable. The advancement has the potential for many future applications, including helping to guide the development of therapies to treat and cure disease.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2p04JpH
via IFTTT

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Broad advance from chemists dramatically simplifies olefin synthesis

Chemists have discovered a new method that greatly simplifies, and in many cases enables for the first time, the making of a vast range of organic molecules.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oQI7pf
via IFTTT

Nanoparticles remain unpredictable

The way that nanoparticles behave in the environment is extremely complex. There is currently a lack of systematic experimental data to help understand them comprehensively, as environmental scientists have shown in a large overview study. A more standardized approach would help to advance the research field.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2o3BTFn
via IFTTT

Degradable electronic components created from corn starch

As consumers upgrade their gadgets at an increasing pace, the amount of electronic waste we generate continues to mount. To help combat this environmental problem, researchers have modified a degradable bioplastic derived from corn starch or other natural sources for use in more eco-friendly electronic components.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oOLz45
via IFTTT

Making oil from algae: Towards more efficient biofuels

The mechanism behind oil synthesis within microalgae cells has now been revealed by a research team. This discovery could contribute to the development of biofuels, they say.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pRtPnF
via IFTTT

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Novel semiconductor nanofiber with superb charge conductivity developed

A novel technology that embeds highly conductive nanostructure into semi-conductor nanofiber has now been developed by researchers. The novel composite so produced has superb charge conductivity, and can therefore be widely applied, especially in environmental arena.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pPSB7C
via IFTTT

New method can model chemistry in extreme magnetic fields of white dwarfs

Approximately 10-20 percent of white dwarfs exhibit strong magnetic fields, which can reach up to 100,000 tesla. However, on Earth, the strongest magnetic fields that can be generated using nondestructive magnets are about 100 tesla. Therefore, studying the chemistry in such extreme conditions is only possible using theory and until now has not provided much insight to the spectra accompanying white dwarfs.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oKiCWM
via IFTTT

Better living through pressure: Functional nanomaterials made easy

Using pressure instead of chemicals, nanoparticles have been fabricated into nanowire arrays similar to those that underlie touch-screens for phones, computers, TVs, and sensors. The pressure process takes nanoseconds instead of the hours required by industry's current chemical means, say investigators.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2px8MdD
via IFTTT

Researchers capture excess photon energy to produce solar fuels

Scientists have developed a proof-of-principle photoelectrochemical cell capable of capturing excess photon energy normally lost to generating heat.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2o02sv7
via IFTTT

'Gamers' method creates unique 4-D molecular spectral maps

Researchers have created a new method to extract the static and dynamic structure of complex chemical systems. In this context, 'structure' doesn't just mean the 3-D arrangement of atoms that make up a molecule, but rather time-dependent quantum-mechanical degrees of freedom that dictate the optical, chemical and physical properties of the system.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oJNQgN
via IFTTT

New battery coating could improve smart phones and electric vehicles

High performing lithium-ion batteries are a key component of laptops, smart phones, and electric vehicles. Currently, the anodes, or negative charged side of lithium ion batteries, are generally made with graphite or other carbon-based materials. Now a new discovery may help unravel a 40-year mystery and could greatly improve battery performance in electronic devices and electric vehicles

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2ok10Qo
via IFTTT

Monday, April 17, 2017

Mechanism behind the electric charges generated by photosynthesis

Photosynthesis requires a mechanism to produce large amounts of chemical energy without losing the oxidative power needed to break down water. A research team has clarified part of this mechanism, marking another step towards the potential development of artificial photosynthesis.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pqP6YP
via IFTTT

Twist and shine: Development of a new photoluminescent sensor material

Stress sensors are important tools when it comes to evaluating the robustness of a material facing strong mechanical forces. Researchers have just published an article reporting a new kind of sensor molecules that brightens up when the material they are incorporated into comes under heavy mechanical stress.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2ptMFlt
via IFTTT

Nuclease-resistant hybrid nanoflowers

An eco-friendly method to synthesize DNA-copper nanoflowers with high load efficiencies, low cytotoxicity, and strong resistance against nucleases has been developed by researchers.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2ptrlMQ
via IFTTT

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Computers create recipe for two new magnetic materials

Material scientists have predicted and built two new magnetic materials, atom-by-atom, using high-throughput computational models. The success marks a new era for the large-scale design of new magnetic materials at unprecedented speed.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oizeCY
via IFTTT

Nanotubes that build themselves

Researchers have succeeded in producing nanotubes from a single building block using so-called molecular self-recognition. The tube can also change shape depending on the surrounding environment. The results can contribute to the future development of transport channels for drugs through the cell membrane.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2nPwqSQ
via IFTTT

Better than nature: Artificial biofilm increases energy production in microbial fuel cells

Microbial fuel cells exploit the metabolism of bacteria in order to generate electricity. A new type of biofilm could soon make this relatively young technology considerably more effective, more stable, and easier to use. A research team has succeeded in producing a material that is far better suited for energy production in fuel cells than natural biofilms.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pnw8zu
via IFTTT

New material could save time and money in medical imaging and environmental remediation

Chemists have developed a material that holds the key to cheap, fast and portable new sensors for a wide range of chemicals that right now cost government and industries large sums to detect.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pmpD01
via IFTTT

First chemical map of dyes from historic dye library

Researchers have released the first chemical 'map' of dyes from the Max A. Weaver Dye Library, which contains almost 100,000 samples of unique dyes and fabrics. The information could assist researchers in developing dyes with desirable properties.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oKHvDF
via IFTTT

Drones collect measurements from a volcanic plume at Volcán de Fuego, Guatemala

A team of volcanologists and engineers have collected measurements from directly within volcanic clouds, together with visual and thermal images of inaccessible volcano peaks.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oKr5eH
via IFTTT

Friday, April 14, 2017

Chemists devise simple method for making sought-after boronic acid-based drugs and other products

A broad and strikingly easy method has been developed for synthesizing a class of molecules that have demonstrated value as pharmaceuticals.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oHRFox
via IFTTT

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Battery prototype powered by atmospheric nitrogen

As the most abundant gas in Earth's atmosphere, nitrogen has been an attractive option as a source of renewable energy. But nitrogen gas doesn't break apart under normal conditions, presenting a challenge to scientists who want to transfer the chemical energy of its triple bond into electricity. Researchers present one approach to capturing atmospheric nitrogen that can be used in a battery.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oEbzkw
via IFTTT

Device pulls water from dry air, powered only by the sun

While it's easy to condense water from humid air, machines that harvest water from drier air require energy. Researchers have created the first water harvester that uses only ambient sunlight. The key component is an extremely porous material called a metal-organic framework that absorbs 20 percent of its weight in water from low-humidity air. Sunlight heats the MOF, releasing the water vapor, which condenses to produce liters of water per day.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2pe15Gd
via IFTTT

Lab on a chip designed to minimize preterm births

With help from a palm-sized plastic rectangle, researchers are hoping to minimize the problem of premature deliveries. The chip is designed to predict, with up to 90 percent accuracy, a woman's risk for a future preterm birth.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2obc7u3
via IFTTT

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

New breed of supermolecule 'hunts down' harmful drugs and removes them from water

Researchers have found an effective, environmentally friendly way to monitor and remove pharmaceuticals from water.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2o7Qlrh
via IFTTT

Non-flammable graphene membrane developed for safe mass production

A simple and scalable method for turning graphene oxide into a non-flammable and paper-like graphene membrane that can be used in large-scale production has now been identified by researchers.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2puNpGj
via IFTTT

Surprisingly long lifetime of high adhesion property of plasma-treated Polytetrafluoroethylene

Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), or Telfon® as it is better known, is used in a variety of daily products, from cookware to carpets, because of its non-sticky property. However, this very same non-stickiness has limited its application to other fields including medicine. Scientists have reported how heat-assisted plasma treatment can modify PTFE to solve this problem.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2o6V1O8
via IFTTT

'Indistinguishable photons' key to advancing quantum technologies

To really take off, advanced quantum information processing will require getting a better (experimental) grasp of an essential phenomenon called “indistinguishable photons.” A high degree of “indistinguishability” requires almost complete wave-packet overlap, or perfect photon matching, of energy, space, time and polarization.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2p6VMeH
via IFTTT

Potentially hazardous substances identified in inflatable pool toys

Inflatable toys and swimming aids, like bathing rings and arm bands, often have a distinctive smell which could indicate that they contain a range of potentially hazardous substances. Some of these compounds, which include carbonyl compounds, cyclohexanone, phenol and isophorone, might be critical in higher concentrations in children's toys, say researchers.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oz00uI
via IFTTT

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Glowing bacteria detect buried landmines

Clearing landmines is dangerous work, posing risk of injury or death to personnel trying to find them. Responding to this need, researchers report a novel system combining lasers and fluorescent bacteria to remotely map the location of buried landmines and unexploded ordnance.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2p1WE46
via IFTTT

Monday, April 10, 2017

Graphene, electricity used to change stem cells for nerve regrowth

Scientists are combining their expertise to change stem cells for nerve regrowth.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2olchSW
via IFTTT

Diamonds coupled using quantum physics

Researchers at TU Wien have succeeded in coupling the specific defects in two such diamonds with one another. This is an important prerequisite for the development of new applications, such as highly sensitive sensors and switches for quantum computers.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oRPcZK
via IFTTT

Controlling electron spin for efficient water splitting

Water is made of oxygen and hydrogen, and splitting water molecules to produce hydrogen for fuel is a promising path for alternative energy. One of the main obstacles to making hydrogen production a reality is that current methods of water splitting result in hydrogen peroxide also being formed. Now researchers have succeeded in almost fully suppressing the production of hydrogen peroxide by controlling the spin of electrons in the reaction. The efficient production of hydrogen paves the way toward the use of solar energy to split water.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oqYmLM
via IFTTT

Pinpoint creation of chirality by organic catalysts

A new catalytic system has been developed that enables highly stereoselective synthesis of amino acid derivatives. A slight structural change in this amino acid-derived organic catalyst leads to pinpoint inversion of stereochemistry. This strategy is expected to become a powerful tool to synthesize various molecules that contain multiple stereocenters in high selectivity and efficiency.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2nltTQ5
via IFTTT

Major breakthrough in smart printed electronics

Researchers have fabricated printed transistors consisting entirely of 2-dimensional nanomaterials for the first time. This breakthrough could unlock the potential for applications such as food packaging that displays a digital countdown to warn you of spoiling, wine labels that alert you when your white wine is at its optimum temperature, or even a window pane that shows the day's forecast.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2o7jciG
via IFTTT

Physicists develop ultrathin superconducting film

Experimental physicists have developed a thin nanomaterial with superconducting properties. Below about -200 °C these materials conduct electricity without loss, levitate magnets and can screen magnetic fields. The particularly interesting aspect of this work is that the research team has succeeded in creating superconducting nanowires that can be woven into an ultra-thin film that is as flexible as cling film.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/2oO9LD3
via IFTTT