Saturday, April 30, 2016

Geochemical detectives use lab mimicry to look back in time

New work contains some unexpected findings about iron chemistry under high-pressure conditions, such as those likely found in the Earth's core, where iron predominates and creates our planet's life-shielding magnetic field. The results could shed light on Earth's early days when the core was formed through a process called differentiation -- when the denser materials, like iron, sunk inward toward the center, creating the layered composition the planet has today.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VZM5sq
via IFTTT

Engineers produce biodiesel from microalgae in three hours

By using native cells from the Lake of Texcoco, researchers reduce biofuel production time.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1O3RN4L
via IFTTT

Using oxygen to sterilize medical implants could save time and money

Researchers have demonstrated a cheap, effective and environmentally friendly way to sterilize medical implants without changing their properties, in contrast to some techniques. This inexpensive technology could save time and money while effectively sterilizing medical implants, does not require extensive training and produces no waste products.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VZbSAI
via IFTTT

Creating a reduced-fat chocolate that melts in your mouth

Chocolate is divinely delicious, mouthwateringly smooth and unfortunately full of fat. But reducing the fat content of the confection makes it harder and less likely to melt in your mouth. That's why scientists are investigating additives that could reinstate chocolate's delightful properties in these lower-fat treats. Now, researchers report an analysis that sheds light on how adding limonene could improve lower-fat versions' texture and ability to melt.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1O3nUBo
via IFTTT

Friday, April 29, 2016

Nanoparticles present sustainable way to grow food crops

Engineers are using nanoparticle technology in an effort to meet the ever-increasing demand for food. Their innovative technique boosts the growth of a protein-rich bean by improving the way it absorbs nutrients, while reducing the need for fertilizer.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1rnPG6V
via IFTTT

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Contamination in North Dakota linked to fracking spills

Accidental wastewater spills from unconventional oil production in North Dakota have caused widespread water and soil contamination, a new study finds. Researchers found high levels of contaminants and salt in surface waters polluted by the brine-laden wastewater, which primarily comes from fracked wells. Soil at spill sites was contaminated with radium. At one site, high levels of contaminants were detected in residual waters four years after the spill occurred.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1NVjwVf
via IFTTT

One-step graphene patterning method created

Researchers have developed a one-step, facile method to pattern graphene by using stencil mask and oxygen plasma reactive-ion etching, and subsequent polymer-free direct transfer to flexible substrates.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1N0N7BO
via IFTTT

Clothing made from tea byproduct could improve health of fashion industry

The fashion industry generates a lot of waste, which is why a team of researchers developed a new fiber that's 100 percent biodegradable. Researchers are testing the fiber – made from a green tea byproduct – to see if it's a viable alternative.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1UhrSNk
via IFTTT

One minus one does not always equal zero in chemistry

In 1848, Louis Pasteur showed that molecules that are mirror images of each other had exactly opposite rotations of light. When mixed in solution, they cancel the effects of the other, and no rotation of light is observed. Now, a research team has demonstrated that a mixture of mirror-image molecules crystallized in the solid state can be optically active.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1SPEEU5
via IFTTT

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Nanotube semiconductors well-suited for PV systems

Researchers have discovered single-walled carbon nanotube semiconductors could be favorable for photovoltaic systems because they can potentially convert sunlight to electricity or fuels without losing much energy.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/26sU0lE
via IFTTT

Ancient glass-glued walls studied for nuke waste solutions

The modern challenge of nuclear waste storage and disposal has researchers looking back at ancient materials from around the world.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Nyu9SU
via IFTTT

Seeing atoms and molecules in action with an electron 'eye'

A unique rapid-fire electron source -- originally built as a prototype for driving next-generation X-ray lasers -- will help scientists study ultrafast chemical processes and changes in materials at the atomic scale.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pDyc53
via IFTTT

Quick mapping of our microbiomes and metabolomes

While technological advances have made it easier to map our microbiomes and metabolomes, these studies typically take too long for that data to be medically useful. Researchers have now used the 2016 San Diego Fermentation Festival as a test case for a novel rapid response system. The team collected samples, analyzed data and reported conclusions in an unprecedented 48 hours.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pDtcNR
via IFTTT

One oil field a key culprit in global ethane gas increase

A single US shale oil field is responsible for much of the past decade's increase in global atmospheric levels of ethane, a gas that can damage air quality and impact climate, according to new study.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1XVoXsO
via IFTTT

Bioreactors ready for the big time

Bioreactors are passive filtration systems that can reduce nitrate losses from farm fields. Most bioreactors are simple pits filled with wood chips; bacteria on the wood chips remove 25 to 45 percent of the nitrate in runoff water. New research highlights their potential applications and provides insight into design options.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VQGXay
via IFTTT

Groundwater quality changes alongside expansion of hydraulic fracturing

New research demonstrates that groundwater quality changes alongside the expansion of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing but also suggests that some potentially hazardous effects may dissipate over time.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1rxnY86
via IFTTT

Radioactive waste disposal could be safer and cheaper

Scientists have developed a technology to reprocess irradiated reactor graphite by evaporation. This technology allows making radioactive waste disposal safer and economically feasible.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1rfdj1z
via IFTTT

Monday, April 25, 2016

Environmental impacts of demand-side technologies, strategies for carbon mitigation

A new article aims to advance our understanding of life cycle environmental and natural resource implications of energy efficiency technologies.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1XSHNRe
via IFTTT

Rare Earth atoms see the light

Physicists have discovered a promising new route for combined optical and solid-state-based quantum information.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1NMky5N
via IFTTT

Novel anti-biofilm nano coating developed

A new anti-biofilm nano coating has been developed by a team of researchers. Their solution addresses a pervasive need to design environmentally friendly materials to impede dangerous surface bacteria growth, they say, holding potential for averting biofilm formed by surface-anchored bacteria.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1TsNaFB
via IFTTT

Saturday, April 23, 2016

New state of water molecule discovered

Neutron scattering and computational modeling have revealed unique and unexpected behavior of water molecules under extreme confinement that is unmatched by any known gas, liquid or solid states.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1WNLdXb
via IFTTT

Advances in extracting uranium from seawater

The oceans hold more than four billion tons of uranium -- enough to meet global energy needs for the next 10,000 years if only we could capture the element from seawater to fuel nuclear power plants. Major advances in this area have now been made.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1NHrlhc
via IFTTT

Friday, April 22, 2016

Single molecule electronic DNA sequencing advanced

A team reports achieving real-time single molecule electronic DNA sequencing at single-base resolution using a protein nanopore array. The work sets the stage for revolutionary, cost-effective genetic diagnostic platforms with unprecedented potential for precision medicine.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1T3HwXL
via IFTTT

Adding some salt to the recipe for energy storage materials

A team of researchers has recently discovered a way to improve the recipe for energy storage materials, and make the resulting materials bigger and better and soaking up energy -- the secret? Just add salt.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VqsjX3
via IFTTT

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Cool combination produces easier carbon bonds

By combining two century-old techniques in organic chemistry, chemists are able to make organic compounds with greater ease and precision. Such compounds are important for drug discovery and development.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VJel2m
via IFTTT

Making electronics out of coal

Engineers have discovered how coal can be used for electronics, by noting chemical, electrical, and optical properties of thin films of different coal types.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1r2yYdd
via IFTTT

New molecule-building method opens vast realm of chemistry for pharma and other industries

Scientists have devised a new molecule-building method likely to have a major impact on the pharmaceutical industry and other chemistry-based enterprises. The method allows construction of novel, complex and potentially valuable molecules, starting from a large class of relatively cheap and non-toxic carboxylic acids compounds.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1WInveM
via IFTTT

Chemists shed new light on global energy food supply challenge

All living things require nitrogen for survival, but the world depends on only two known processes to break nitrogen's ultra-strong bonds to allow conversion to a form humans, animals and plants can consume. One is a natural, bacterial process on which farmers have relied since the dawn of agriculture. The other is the century-old Haber-Bösch process, which revolutionized fertilizer production and spurred unprecedented growth of the global food supply.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1TlxZhw
via IFTTT

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

What screens are made of: New twists (and bends) in LCD research

A research team has directly measured a spiral molecular arrangement formed by liquid crystals that could help unravel its mysteries and possibly improve the performance of electronic displays.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pji20s
via IFTTT

Light source for quicker computer chips

Worldwide growing data volumes make conventional electronic processing reach its limits. Future information technology is therefore expected to use light as a medium for quick data transmission also within computer chips. Researchers have now demonstrated that carbon nanotubes are suited for use as on-chip light source for tomorrow's information technology, when nanostructured waveguides are applied to obtain the desired light properties.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1rn2efb
via IFTTT

Battery tech with off-the-charts charging capacity

Researchers have invented nanowire-based battery material that can be recharged hundreds of thousands of times, moving us closer to a battery that would never require replacement. The breakthrough work could lead to commercial batteries with greatly lengthened lifespans for computers, smartphones, appliances, cars and spacecraft.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VGwNbQ
via IFTTT

New method enlists electricity for easier cheaper greener chemistry

Scientists have found a new and better way to achieve a chemical reaction that is used widely in the pharmaceutical as well as flavor and fragrance industries.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1rlis8w
via IFTTT

Novel uniform coating process of p-ALD revealed

Particle atomic layer deposition (p-ALD) is highlighted as a technology that can create new and exciting designer core/shell particles to be used as building blocks for the next generation of complex multifunctional nanocomposites.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1MIgMPU
via IFTTT

Researchers develop new semiconducting polymer for forthcoming flexible electronics

A new n-type semiconducting polymer with superior electron mobility and oxidative stability has been developed by researchers. The team modified an n-type conjugated polymer with semi-fluoroalkyl side chains. As a result, the modified polymer was shown to form a superstructure composed of polymer backbone crystals and side-chain crystals, resulting in a high degree of semicrystalline order.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1qZBdhu
via IFTTT

How to avoid foot amputation in diabetic patients?

Scientists have developed techniques to treat diabetic foot syndrome with special insoles with silver nano-particles. The techniques help to fight ulcers appearing on feet in diabetic patients, facilitates their healing and disinfection, reducing the risk of amputation.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1WFiSCt
via IFTTT

Tuesday, April 19, 2016

SteamBio enabling sustainable carbon for industry

To create a more secure and sustainable future we need to use carbon from nature: “biocarbon”; using it to create biodegradable bioplastics, other biochemicals and for renewable energy generation that is available when required. Steambio is a collaboration of eleven partners from industry and academia with a common purpose: to create a viable business based on superheated steam torrefaction of forestry and agricultural residues.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1SYns92
via IFTTT

Research improves conductive plastic for health energy other technologies

An international team of scientists has developed methods to improve the performance of a conductive plastic that can be used in devices that interface with the human body.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VAeuWk
via IFTTT

Microbial biosensor designed to evaluate water toxicity

A paper-based biosensor covered with bacteria has been designed to detect water toxicity. This is an innovative and inexpensive biological tool which can be easy to use in economically restricted areas or developing countries.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Sr81c8
via IFTTT

Researchers achieve a first by coaxing molecules into assembling themselves

Chemistry researchers have managed to coax molecules known as tellurazole oxides into assembling themselves into cyclic structures -- a major advance in their field that creates a new and promising set of materials.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1peR36f
via IFTTT

Cheap efficient and flexible solar cells: New world record for fullerene-free polymer solar cells

Polymer solar cells can be even cheaper and more reliable thanks to a new breakthrough. This work is about avoiding costly and unstable fullerenes.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1SXlYw3
via IFTTT

Monday, April 18, 2016

Exfoliating thinner flakes of phosphorene at higher yield

By deoxygenating water, researchers discovered a new way to exfoliate phosphorene into atomically thin flakes. In order for phosphorene to reach its full potential, it needs to be incredibly thin -- preferably at the atomic scale. Until now, researchers have experienced difficulties in exfoliating atomically thin flakes from the bulk material, called black phosphorus, in a quick and efficient manner.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1SoDEDk
via IFTTT

Unexpected discovery leads to a better battery

An unexpected discovery has led to a zinc-manganese oxide rechargeable battery that's as inexpensive as conventional car batteries, but has a much higher energy density.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/26bfqUj
via IFTTT

A new way to get electricity from magnetism

By showing that a phenomenon dubbed the 'inverse spin Hall effect' works in several organic semiconductors -- including carbon-60 buckyballs -- physicists changed magnetic 'spin current' into electric current. The efficiency of this new power conversion method isn't yet known, but it might find use in future electronic devices including batteries, solar cells and computers.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/23TCRzb
via IFTTT

'Pee power' turns urine into sustainable power source for electronic devices

Researchers have developed an innovative miniature fuel cell that can generate electricity from urine, creating an affordable, renewable and carbon-neutral way of generating power.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1QhVt2e
via IFTTT

Saturday, April 16, 2016

Ultrathin organic material enhances e-skin display

Researchers have developed an ultrathin, ultraflexible, protective layer and demonstrated its use by creating an air-stable, organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display. This technology will enable creation of electronic skin (e-skin) displays of blood oxygen level, e-skin heart rate sensors for athletes and many other applications.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1TbCRFP
via IFTTT

Atomically thin sensor detects harmful air pollution in the home

Scientists have developed a graphene-based sensor and switch that can detect harmful air pollution in the home with very low power consumption.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/23Fp6HP
via IFTTT

Friday, April 15, 2016

Janus-like nanoparticle membranes

Nanoparticles are known to self-assemble at the air-water interface into large 2D sheets. Researchers discovered that an organic coating on the nanoparticles differs slightly between the two sides of the membrane.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Qd0s4h
via IFTTT

Atomically-thin sensor detects harmful air pollution in the home

A graphene-based sensor and switch has been developed that can detect harmful air pollution in the home with very low power consumption.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VvJyGM
via IFTTT

Artificial leaf? Successful synthesis of ammonia using visible light, water, and atmospheric nitrogen

By using a photoelectrode in which gold nanoparticles are loaded on an oxide semiconductor substrate, a research has worked to develop a method of artificial photosynthesis that may prove to be an excellent light energy conversion system.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1T9LC38
via IFTTT

Physicists build engine consisting of one atom

An innovative form of heat engine operates using only one single atom.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1SGDjJ0
via IFTTT