Thursday, March 31, 2016

Pharmacy on demand: Portable system can be configured to produce different drugs

Researchers have developed a compact, portable pharmaceutical manufacturing system that can be reconfigured to produce a variety of drugs on demand.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1TlZ4Tv
via IFTTT

Paperlike battery electrode made with glass-ceramic

A mechanical engineer has developed a paperlike battery electrode that may improve tools for space exploration or unmanned aerial vehicles.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Uvh27m
via IFTTT

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Technology to enable unzipping of the graphene plane

A research team has developed a technique, which enables unzipping of the graphene plane without uncontrollable damage.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1q3TTfI
via IFTTT

One step closer to sustainable hydrogen production

By lengthening nanorods, hydrogen production can happen quicker and more sustainably, researchers have discovered. The researchers determined that lengthening nanorods to 50 nanometers, a size 1,000 times smaller than the diameter of a hair, increased the hydrogen production rate of a rare form of titania called brookite, only accessible at the nanoscale.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1MUqDg0
via IFTTT

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Effective graphene doping depends on substrate material

Physicists have discovered unexpected effects in doped graphene. They investigated samples of the carbon compound enriched with the foreign atom nitrogen on various substrate materials. Unwanted interactions with these substrates can influence the electric properties of graphene. The researchers have now shown that effective doping depends on the choice of substrate material.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/22Yo85u
via IFTTT

Researchers developed manufacturing method for batteries with organic electrode materials

With people wanting to use smaller electronic devices, smaller energy storage systems are needed. Researchers have demonstrated the fabrication of electrochemically active organic lithium electrode thin films, which help make microbatteries more efficient than before. Researchers used a combined atomic/molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD) technique, to prepare lithium terephthalate, a recently found anode material for a lithium-ion battery.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1LWZJcH
via IFTTT

Monday, March 28, 2016

New method of trapping multiple particles using fluidics

Precise control of an individual particle or molecule is a difficult task. Controlling multiple particles simultaneously is an even more challenging endeavor. Researchers have developed a new method that relies on fluid flow to manipulate and assemble multiple particles. This new technique can trap a range of submicron- to micron-sized particles, including single DNA molecules, vesicles, drops or cells.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1US2VbY
via IFTTT

Charged salts can extract specific central lanthanide elements, scientists show

Researchers wanted to find out if it was possible to make a molecule that could selectively bind to metal cations in the middle of the lanthanide series. The team provided a proof-of-principle in a new article.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1RCKDYO
via IFTTT

Physicists 'undiscovered' technetium carbide

Technetium carbide does not exist -- it was pure technetium that was mistakenly considered as such, say physicists. This is important from the view point of chemistry of transition metal carbides which are in many ways considered as promising substances.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1RBGsfR
via IFTTT

Safer, cheaper, 'greener,' more efficient system for the synthesis of organic compounds

Chemists have devised a safer, more environmentally friendly, less expensive and more efficient water-based system for the synthesis of organic compounds typically used in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, cosmetics, plastics, textiles and household chemicals.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1TeOb60
via IFTTT

Quantum effects at work in the world's smelliest superconductor

Quantum effects are the reason that hydrogen sulphide -- which has the distinct smell of rotten eggs -- behaves as a superconductor at record-breaking temperatures, which may aid in the search for room temperature superconductors, researchers have found.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Srn8Sx
via IFTTT

New reaction turns feedstock chemical into versatile, chiral building block

Researchers have developed a direct cross-coupling reaction to produce versatile building blocks that are highly useful in pharmaceutical research from the feedstock chemical pyridine.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1TebhJO
via IFTTT

Sunday, March 27, 2016

Computer simulation discloses new effect of cavitation

Researchers have discovered a so far unknown formation mechanism of cavitation bubbles by means of a model calculation. In a new article, they describe how oil-repellent and oil-attracting surfaces influence a passing oil flow. Depending on the viscosity of the oil, a steam bubble forms in the transition area. However, it may also have a positive effect, as it may keep components at a certain distance and, thus, prevent damage.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1q9An1a
via IFTTT

Saturday, March 26, 2016

New class of molecular 'lightbulbs' illuminate MRI

Scientists have discovered a new class of molecular tags that enhance MRI signals by 10,000-fold and generate detectable signals that last over an hour. The tags are biocompatible and inexpensive to produce, paving the way for widespread use of MRI to monitor the metabolic processes of conditions like cancer and heart disease in real time.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1LPsaco
via IFTTT

Nanocrystal self-assembly sheds its secrets

The secret to a long-hidden magic trick behind the self-assembly of nanocrystal structures is starting to be revealed.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1SdaUue
via IFTTT

Friday, March 25, 2016

Moving microswimmers using magnetic vortices

Scientistshave discovered a way to use a microscopic, swirling flow to rapidly clear a circle of tiny bacteria or swimming robots.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pNCyrj
via IFTTT

Thursday, March 24, 2016

Scientists part the clouds on how droplets form

A new study reveals that much more is happening at the microscopic level of cloud formation than previously thought. The findings could help improve the accuracy of climate change models.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1RoJkfU
via IFTTT

Efficient methane C-H bond activation achieved for the first time

Using a new hybrid breed of computational and experimental chemistry, an international team of chemists was able to solve a puzzle that has been dubbed a 'Holy Grail reaction' and devise a method for catalyzing reactions with methane.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1XQHdDj
via IFTTT

Graphene nanoribbons: It's all about the edges

As electronic components are becoming ever smaller, the industry is gradually approaching the limits of what is achievable using the traditional approach with silicon as a semiconductor material. Graphene, the material with a number of "miraculous" properties, is considered a possible replacement. The one atom thin carbon film is ultra-light, extremely flexible and highly conductive.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1SjGRn8
via IFTTT

Newly discovered organic nanowires leave humanmade technologies in their dust

A microbial protein fiber newly discovered transports charges at rates high enough to be applied in humanmade nanotechnologies. The discovery describes the high-speed protein fiber produced by uranium-reducing Geobacter bacteria. The fibers are hair-like protein filaments called 'pili' that have the unique property of transporting charges at speeds of 1 billion electrons per second.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1RzIQRe
via IFTTT

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Making molecules comfy: Ultimate challenge for 'glass guy'

For 30 years, one researcher has been exploring the fundamental properties of organic glass while inventing ways to control the placement of molecules and slow the degradation of a substance that does not have the rigidity of a crystal.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1LIjrIU
via IFTTT

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

New chemistries found for liquid batteries

A grid-scale approach to rechargeable power storage gets a new arsenal of possible materials, researchers have found. Liquid metal batteries are a promising candidate for making renewable energy more practical. The batteries can store large amounts of energy and thus even out the ups and downs of power production and power use, report researchers.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Riz0WT
via IFTTT

Nanoparticle-based cancer therapies shown to work in humans

Nanoparticles can function to target tumors while avoiding adjacent healthy tissue in human cancer patients, new research indicates. The findings demonstrate that nanoparticle-based therapies can act as a 'precision medicine' for targeting tumors while leaving healthy tissue intact.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VB6NNY
via IFTTT

Tougher plastic with 50 percent renewable content

Researchers have made a better thermoplastic by replacing styrene with lignin, a brittle, rigid polymer that, with cellulose, forms the woody cell walls of plants. In doing so, they have invented a solvent-free production process that interconnects equal parts of nanoscale lignin dispersed in a synthetic rubber matrix to produce a meltable, moldable, ductile material that's at least ten times tougher than ABS, a common thermoplastic.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1WFUmyS
via IFTTT

Carbon leads the way in clean energy: New method uses cheap carbon-based catalyst to deliver energy using hydrogen

Groundbreaking research is leading the way in clean energy, with the use of carbon as a way to deliver energy using hydrogen.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1RhcEVD
via IFTTT

Printing nanomaterials with plasma

Printing has come a long way since the days of Johannes Gutenberg. Now, researchers have developed a new method that uses plasma to print nanomaterials onto a 3-D object or flexible surface, such as paper or cloth. The technique could make it easier and cheaper to build devices like wearable chemical and biological sensors, flexible memory devices and batteries, and integrated circuits.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1UihOEN
via IFTTT

Monday, March 21, 2016

Uncovering bacterial role in platinum formation

The important role of specialist bacteria has been uncovered in the formation and movement of platinum and related metals in surface environments.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1UA5ZcF
via IFTTT

Survival of the hardest working

An engineering team has developed a cellular kill switch, a sensor that rewards hard working cells and eliminates their lazy counterparts. The high-tech engineering fix could help improve production of biofuels and pharmaceuticals.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1S1oXD2
via IFTTT

Engineers adapt laser method to create micro energy units

As the demand for thinner microelectronic devices increases, manufacturers often are limited by how oddly shaped the energy sources must become to make them conform to the smaller space. Now, researchers have developed a method of transferring an energy source to virtually any shape. Using direct laser-writing techniques, scientists can help smartphone manufacturers fabricate energy storage units such as micro fuel cells that are environmentally friendly, highly designable and thin.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/22suRYP
via IFTTT

Solar fuels: Refined protective layer for the 'artificial leaf'

A process for providing sensitive semiconductors for solar water splitting ('artificial leaves') with an organic, transparent protective layer has been developed by researchers. The extremely thin protective layer made of carbon chains is stable, conductive, and covered with catalyzing nanoparticles of metal oxides. These accelerate the splitting of water when irradiated by light.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1UyFaWd
via IFTTT

Low-cost, contactless and accurate 3D fingerprint identification system

A low-cost and touchless 3D fingerprint identification has been developed with higher security and hygiene in mind. The touchless 3D finger imaging can provide more accurate personal identification as rich information is available from 3D fingerprint images.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VuRDtM
via IFTTT

Real-time direct observation of atom movements in electron microscopy

Atomic motion in a crystalline oxide that was used as a cathode in Li-ion batteries was directly demonstrated by state-of-an-art transmission electron microscopy, revealing the transient pathway of a chemical ordering reaction.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1VuV2Zm
via IFTTT

Capturing the Acid-base Reactions in Alcohol

A new study has been regarded as "very important" because it offers a new framework for understanding reactions in organic chemistry. In their study, the team addressed the cooperative role of alcohols, the simplest organic protic compounds, in one of elementary reactions in chemistry, the acid-base reaction, in a quantitative manner.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1UxGjxa
via IFTTT

Sunday, March 20, 2016

Pioneering method in the evaluation of nitrate pollution

Environmental researchers have designed an innovative model for the selective recognition of nitrates which is big news for the prevention of environmental pollution.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pDP5O6
via IFTTT

Saturday, March 19, 2016

Chromium breaks the toughest of bonds, with the right support

Scientists have shown what it takes to make long-overlooked chromium help form ammonia; this work is a critical step in controlling a reaction that could store electrons from intermittent wind and solar stations in use-any-time fuels.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1ZdScrF
via IFTTT

Small discovery holds big promise for cancer nanotechnology

The discovery of a new nanostructure promises to advance technology used in the early detection and treatment of cancerous cells.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1ZdSejj
via IFTTT

Friday, March 18, 2016

Aviation and volcanic ash: Don't build model on sand

Volcanic ash can damage jet engines, and volcanologists have developed a new empirical model for assessment of the risk. Their results show that tests using sand do not reflect the behavior of ash in this context.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Mg9nqG
via IFTTT

How nanowires can be formed

Researchers show how different arrangements of atoms can be combined into nanowires as they grow. Researchers learning to control the properties of materials this way can lead the way to more efficient electronic devices.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1R8Ud3j
via IFTTT

Measuring chemistry: Local fingerprint of hydrogen bonding captured in experiments

Chemists have been able for the first time to measure how new bonds influence molecules: they have reconstructed the 'energy landscape' of acetone molecules using measurement data from the Swiss Light Source of the Paul Scherrer Institut, and thereby empirically established the formation of hydrogen bonds between acetone and chloroform molecules. The results assist in understanding fundamental phenomena of chemistry.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1S8rQEA
via IFTTT

Chemists develop an ultra-sensitive test for cancers, HIV

Catching a disease in its earliest stages can lead to more effective therapies. Chemists have increased the likelihood of detecting these diseases via a test that is thousands of times more sensitive than current diagnostics.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1psQLJr
via IFTTT

Capturing the acid-base reactions in alcohol

New research offers a new framework for understanding reactions in organic chemistry. Scientists reported the basicity enhancement of an alcohol by hydrogen-bonded clustering.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Pghdeo
via IFTTT

New carbon capture membrane boasts carbon dioxide highways

A new, highly permeable carbon capture membrane could lead to more efficient ways of separating carbon dioxide from power plant exhaust, preventing the greenhouse gas from entering the atmosphere and contributing to climate change.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1UmkUah
via IFTTT

Advanced magnetic resonance imaging technology to track cells in the body

The need to non-invasively see and track cells in living persons is indisputable. Emerging treatments using stem cells and immune cells are poised to most benefit from cell tracking, which would visualize their behavior in the body after delivery. Clinicians require such data to speed these cell treatments to patients. Researchers now describe a new highly sensitive chemical probe that tags cells for detection by MRI.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pQuDZV
via IFTTT

Thursday, March 17, 2016

Researchers crack 50-year-old nuclear waste problem, make storage safer

Researchers have adapted a technology developed for solar energy in order to selectively remove one of the trickiest and most-difficult-to-remove elements in nuclear waste pools across the country, making the storage of nuclear waste safer and nontoxic - and solving a decades-old problem.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1nT13l3
via IFTTT

Could bread mold build a better rechargeable battery?

You probably don't think much of fungi, and especially those that turn bread moldy, but researchers have evidence that might just change your mind. Their findings suggest that a red bread mold could be the key to producing more sustainable electrochemical materials for use in rechargeable batteries.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Mcg3pw
via IFTTT

'Disruptive device' brings xenon-NMR to fragile materials

Scientists have developed a device that enables NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, coupled with a powerful molecular sensor, to analyze molecular interactions in viscous solutions and fragile materials such as liquid crystals. In a first, their method allows the sensor, hyperpolarized xenon gas, to be dissolved into minute samples of substances without disrupting their molecular order.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pwWUoH
via IFTTT

Capturing 'black gold' with light

New research has found a simple and effective way of capturing graphenes and the toxins and contaminants they attract from water by using light. The findings could have significant implications for large-scale water purification.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pr5kx5
via IFTTT

Low-cost remote detection of hazardous gas levels

Scientists have developed a prototype sensor system which not only allows the remote detection of dangerous gases, but can estimate their concentration levels.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1RmJTdq
via IFTTT

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Lasers help speed up detection of bacterial growth in packaged food

It's important to know how microorganisms -- particularly pathogenic microbes -- grow under various conditions. Certain bacteria can cause food poisoning when eaten and bacterial growth in medical blood supplies, while rare, might necessitate discarding the blood. Now a group of researchers report a fast, accurate, and noninvasive technique for monitoring bacterial growth.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1S4XX88
via IFTTT

Alternative fuels need more than hype to drive transportation market

Hype followed by disappointment: That's been the general pattern over the past few decades when an alternative fuel is presented to the public. It's a fuel du jour phenomenon, from methanol to hydrogen, where government leaders and the media hype a new fuel, only to abandon it when lofty expectations are not met.

from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1puDyjX
via IFTTT