Friday, November 28, 2014

New material makes water and oil roll off

Car finish, to which no dirt particles adhere, house fronts, from which graffiti paints roll off, and shoes that remain clean on muddy paths – the material “fluoropore” might make all this possible. Both water and oil droplets roll off this new class of highly fluorinated super-repellent polymers.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1251jmS

via IFTTT

Single-atom gold catalysts may offer path to low-cost production of fuel and chemicals

New catalysts designed and investigated by engineering researchers have potential to greatly reduce processing costs in future fuels like hydrogen. The catalysts are composed of a unique structure of single gold atoms bound by oxygen to sodium or potassium atoms, supported on non-reactive silica materials. They demonstrate comparable activity and stability with catalysts comprising precious metal nanoparticles on rare earth and other reducible oxide supports when used in producing highly purified hydrogen.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1251j6u

via IFTTT

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Classical enzymatic theory revised by including water motions

Enzymes are macromolecular biological catalysists that lead most of chemical reactions in living organisms. The main focus of enzymology lies on enzymes themselves, whereas the role of water motions in mediating the biological reaction is often left aside owing to the complex molecular behavior. Scientists have now revised the classical enzymatic steady state theory by including long-lasting protein-water coupled motions into models of functional catalysis.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1uJvUfI

via IFTTT

Van der Waals force re-measured: Physicists verified nonlinear increase with growing molecular size

Van der Waals forces act like a sort of quantum glue on all types of matter. Using a new measuring technique, scientists experimentally determined for the first time all of the key details of how strongly the single molecules bind to a surface. With an atomic force microscope, they demonstrated that the forces do not just increase with molecular size, but that they even grow disproportionately fast.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1vPLL2R

via IFTTT

Converting human-generated waste into fuel in space

Who would've known human waste could be used to propel spacecraft from the moon back to Earth? Researchers responded to the call from NASA and came up with a process to convert waste to methane and propel spacecraft to Earth.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1uJvWEh

via IFTTT

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

New plastic that disappears when you want it to

Plastic populates our world through everything from electronics to packaging and vehicles. Once discarded, it resides almost permanently in landfills and oceans. A new discovery holds scientific promise that could lead to a new type of plastic that can be broken down when exposed to a specific type of light and is reduced back to molecules, which could then be used to create new plastic.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1reN8qG

via IFTTT

Breakthrough in flexible electronics enabled by inorganic-based laser lift-off

Engineers have developed an easier methodology to make high performance flexible electronics by using the Inorganic-based Laser Lift-off (ILLO), which enables nanoscale processes for high density flexible devices and high temperature processes that were previously difficult to achieve on plastic substrates.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1xCdq2I

via IFTTT

Researchers find way to turn sawdust into gasoline

Researchers have successfully converted sawdust into building blocks for gasoline. Using a new chemical process, they were able to convert the cellulose in sawdust into hydrocarbon chains. These hydrocarbons can be used as an additive in gasoline, or as a component in plastics.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1reN6iF

via IFTTT

Monday, November 24, 2014

Physicists and chemists work to improve digital memory technology

Researchers are studying graphene and ammonia to develop high-speed, high-capacity random access memory. The team engineered and tested improvements in the performance of a memory structure known as a ferroelectric tunnel junction.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1rkWnAj

via IFTTT

Scientists do glass a solid, with new theory on how it transitions from a liquid

How does glass transition from a liquid to its familiar solid state? How does this common material transport heat and sound? And what microscopic changes occur when a glass gains rigidity as it cools? A team of researchers offers a theoretical explanation for these processes.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1rkWnAb

via IFTTT

Mimics do not substitute for the 'real thing' for bomb-sniffing dogs

Canines trained on pseudo-explosives could not reliably identify the genuine article (and vice versa). When it comes to teaching dogs how to sniff out explosives, there’s nothing quite like the real thing to make sure they’re trained right.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1xOVPIP

via IFTTT

Molecules that came in handy for first life on Earth

For the first time, chemists have successfully produced amino acid-like molecules that all have the same ‘handedness’, from simple building blocks and in a single test tube. Could this be how life started. On Earth? Or in space, as the Philae lander is currently exploring?



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1xOVPbX

via IFTTT

Friday, November 21, 2014

A green transformation for pharmaceuticals

A more sustainable approach to a bond-forming reaction extensively used in the pharmaceutical and fine chemical industries has now been developed. The team used the solvent-free, catalytic reaction to produce high yields of a wide range of amides, including the antidepressant moclobemide and other drug-like molecules.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1AuvH8p

via IFTTT

Streamlining thin film processing for electrodes, display screens

Energy storage devices and computer screens may seem worlds apart, but they’re not. When an electrical engineering professor teamed up with and computer scientists to make a less expensive supercapacitor for storing renewable energy, they developed a new plasma technology that will streamline the production of display screens.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1AuvJ02

via IFTTT

Nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event

A new discovery about the atomic structure of uranium dioxide will help scientists select the best computational model to simulate severe nuclear reactor accidents.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1AuvIZS

via IFTTT

Improved nanomaterials: Understanding surface structure of quantum dots will aid design of new solar devices

A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has just emerged.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1uLHPgs

via IFTTT

Clean energy 'bio batteries' a step closer

Researchers are a step closer to enhancing the generation of clean energy from bacteria. A new report shows how electrons hop across otherwise electrically insulating areas of bacterial proteins, and that the rate of electrical transfer is dependent on the orientation and proximity of electrically conductive ‘stepping stones’. It is hoped that this natural process can be used to improve ‘bio batteries’ which could produce energy for portable technology such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops – powered by human or animal waste.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1uLHOt1

via IFTTT

Thursday, November 20, 2014

Quantum mechanical calculations reveal the hidden states of enzyme active sites

Enzymes carry out fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and respiration, with the help of clusters of metal atoms as 'active' sites. But scientists lack basic information about their function because the states thought to be critical to their chemical abilities cannot be experimentally observed. Now, researchers have reported the first direct observation of the electronic states of iron-sulfur clusters, common to many enzyme active sites.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1qBDFJL

via IFTTT

Spiraling Light, Nanoparticles and Insights Into Life’s Structure

As hands come in left and right versions that are mirror images of each other, so do the amino acids and sugars within us. But unlike hands, only the left-oriented amino acids and the right-oriented sugars ever make into life as we know it.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1F5tspT

via IFTTT

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Thin film produces new chemistry in 'nanoreactor'

Physicists have discovered a new manganese compound that is produced by tension in the crystal structure of terbium manganese oxide. The technique they used to create this new material could open the way to new nanoscale circuits.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1qtAqE7

via IFTTT

Biochemists build largest synthetic molecular 'cage' ever

Biochemists have created the largest protein ever that self-assembles into a molecular cage. Their designed protein, which does not exist in nature, is hundreds of times smaller than a human cell. The research could lead to 'synthetic vaccines' that protect people from the flu, HIV and perhaps other diseases. It could also lead to new methods of delivering pharmaceuticals inside of cells and the creation of new nano-scale materials.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1qXRP2C

via IFTTT

Scientists get to the heart of fool's gold as a solar material

As the installation of photovoltaic solar cells continues to accelerate, scientists are looking for inexpensive materials beyond the traditional silicon that can efficiently convert sunlight into electricity. Theoretically, iron pyrite could do the job, but when it works at all, the conversion efficiency remains frustratingly low. Now, a research team explains why that is, in a discovery that suggests how improvements in this promising material could lead to inexpensive yet efficient solar cells.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1qXRQUc

via IFTTT

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Two sensors in one: Nanoparticles that enable both MRI and fluorescent imaging could monitor cancer, other diseases

Chemists have developed new nanoparticles that can simultaneously perform magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescent imaging in animals. Such particles could help scientists to track specific molecules produced in the body, monitor a tumor's environment, or determine whether drugs have successfully reached their targets.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1wTSPGR

via IFTTT

Physicists suggest new way to detect dark matter

For years physicists have been looking for the universe's elusive dark matter, but so far no one has seen any trace of it. Maybe we are looking in the wrong place? Now physicists propose a new technique to detect dark matter.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1wTSQL0

via IFTTT

Finding new ways to make drugs

Chemists have developed a revolutionary new way to manufacture natural chemicals by clipping smaller molecules together like Lego. They have used the new method to assemble a scarce anti-inflammatory drug with potential to treat cancer and malaria, pseudopterosin.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1wTSNyL

via IFTTT

Monday, November 17, 2014

Graphene/nanotube hybrid benefits flexible solar cells

Scientists have created a graphene/nanotube cathode that may make cheap, flexible dye-sensitized solar cells more practical.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1uHuXZW

via IFTTT

The 'dirty' side of soap: Triclosan, a common antimicrobial in personal hygiene products, causes liver fibrosis and cancer in mice

Triclosan is an antimicrobial commonly found in soaps, shampoos, toothpastes and many other household items. Despite its widespread use, researchers report potentially serious consequences of long-term exposure to the chemical.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1uHuWoT

via IFTTT

Revolutionary solar-friendly form of silicon shines

Silicon is the second most-abundant element in the earth's crust. When purified, it takes on a diamond structure, which is essential to modern electronic devices -- carbon is to biology as silicon is to technology. Scientists have synthesized an entirely new form of silicon, one that promises even greater future applications.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/14ABPPq

via IFTTT

Engineers develop innovative process to print flexible electronic circuits

Engineers have successfully printed complex electronic circuits using a common t-shirt printer. The electronic circuits are printed using unique materials in layers on top of everyday flexible materials such as plastic, aluminum foil and even paper. Resistors, transistors and capacitors, the key components of a complex electronic circuit, are printed using non-toxic organic materials like silver nanoparticles, carbon and plastics.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1HaVXXa

via IFTTT

Friday, November 14, 2014

Chemists develop porous molecules that bind greenhouse gases

Chemistry researchers have developed a molecule that assembles spontaneously into a lightweight structure with microscopic pores capable of binding large quantities of several potent greenhouse gases.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1zV5qzT

via IFTTT

Bacteria become 'genomic tape recorders', recording chemical exposures in their DNA

Engineers have transformed the genome of the bacterium E. coli into a long-term storage device for memory. They envision that this stable, erasable, and easy-to-retrieve memory will be well suited for applications such as sensors for environmental and medical monitoring.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1wz68wm

via IFTTT

Technology to advance stem cell therapeutics patented

A highly robust, efficient nanoparticle-based platform that can regulate gene expression and eventually stem cell differentiation has been developed by researchers. NanoScript is the first nanomaterial TF protein that can interact with endogenous DNA.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1wz62ox

via IFTTT

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Major class of fracking chemicals no more toxic than common household substances, analysis finds

The 'surfactant' chemicals found in samples of fracking fluid collected in five states were no more toxic than substances commonly found in homes, according to a first-of-its-kind analysis.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Bhf5Ci

via IFTTT

All 'quantum weirdness' may be caused by interacting parallel worlds, physicist theorizes

A new theory of quantum mechanics was developed by Bill Poirier, a chemical physicist. The theory discusses parallel worlds' existence and the quantum effects observed in nature.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1Bhf5lU

via IFTTT

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

A twisted world: Chemists build a molecular banister

Chemists have succeeded in twisting a molecule by combining molecular strands of differing lengths. The longer strand winds around a central axis like a staircase banister, creating a helical structure that exhibits special physical properties.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1un8am3

via IFTTT

Ethanol and heterogeneous catalysts for biodiesel production

Biodiesel is an alternative fuel to conventional fossil ones. The EU policies of boosting biodiesel have achieved its implementation in the transport fuels market and increasingly its sustainable nature is being taken into account. Thus, up to 86 % of the biofuels used in the EU in 2013 achieved the certificate of sustainability, in accordance with the Community norms.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1un8cKI

via IFTTT

European spacecraft set to harpoon a comet

Early tomorrow morning (Nov. 12), the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft will deploy its comet lander, "Philae." A little over seven hours later (8 a.m. PST/11 a.m. EST), the experiment-laden, harpoon-firing Philae is scheduled to touch down on the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It will be the first time in history that a spacecraft has attempted a soft landing on a comet. Rosetta is an international mission led by the European Space Agency (ESA), with instruments provided by its member states, and additional support and instruments provided by NASA.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pRg5bA

via IFTTT

'Forests' of carbon nanotubes grown on 3-D substrates

Researchers are growing vertically aligned “forests” of carbon nanotubes on three-dimensional (3-D) conductive substrates to explore their potential use as a cathode in next-gen lithium batteries.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pRg5bw

via IFTTT

Bending but not breaking: In search of new materials

Researchers have chemically engineered a new, electrically conductive nanomaterial that is flexible enough to fold, but strong enough to support many times its own weight. They believe it can be used to improve electrical energy storage, water filtration and radiofrequency shielding in technology from portable electronics to coaxial cables.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pRg4Vc

via IFTTT

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Space: The final frontier in silicon chemistry

Silicon, which is one of the most common elements in Earth’s crust, is also sprinkled abundantly throughout interstellar space. The only way to identify silicon-containing molecules in the far corners of the cosmos – and to understand the chemistry that created them – is to observe through telescopes the electromagnetic radiation the molecules emit.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1xq5PGZ

via IFTTT

A billion holes can make a battery

Researchers have invented a single tiny structure that includes all the components of a battery that they say could bring about the ultimate miniaturization of energy storage components.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1tCTABY

via IFTTT

Monday, November 10, 2014

New materials yield record efficiency polymer solar cells

Researchers have found that temperature-controlled aggregation in a family of new semi-conducting polymers is the key to creating highly efficient organic solar cells that can be mass produced more cheaply.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1ElrD84

via IFTTT

Untangling unknown structures in the mix

The characterization of individual components in an unknown crystalline powder mixture is a challenge that has eluded scientists for many years. Now, researchers have for the first time invented a methodology to accurately determine the crystal structures present in such mixtures.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pIMNvP

via IFTTT

Long-lived catalyst facilitates first steps toward viable small-scale on-board hydrogen generator

Researchers are helping to advance the development of hydrogen-powered cars by producing innovative materials that could make on-board hydrogen generators a reality. Hydrogen is a renewable resource with the potential to power everything from households to cars, but its use is currently limited by a lack of green and practical production methods.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1pIMNfg

via IFTTT

How LCDs work

A little video I put together to explain how liquid crystal displays work, using pasta, stair gates, wool, a hair dryer and some polarizing filters.







from Chemistry Blog http://ift.tt/1EjIckT

via IFTTT

Saturday, November 8, 2014

On the Trail of Proteins: Scientists electrochemically detect protein binding on semiconductors

Scientists have succeeded in electrochemically detecting protein binding on semiconductor materials for the first time, thanks to a newly developed investigative method based on differences in electrical charge. Now the physicists are working on an optical process to detect and localize protein binding directly under a microscope, for example, a method that could launch new applications in medical research and diagnostics.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1ovCr1s

via IFTTT

Friday, November 7, 2014

Possible alternative to antibiotics: Nanoparticles made of lipids

A novel substance for the treatment of severe bacterial infections has been developed to work without antibiotics. Scientists say that this would prevent the development of antibiotic resistance. Scientists engineered artificial nanoparticles made of lipids, "liposomes" that closely resemble the membrane of host cells. These liposomes act as decoys for bacterial toxins and so are able to sequester and neutralize them.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1AyuPAx

via IFTTT

Thursday, November 6, 2014

Engineered for tolerance, bacteria pump out higher quantity of renewable gasoline

An international team of bioengineers has boosted the ability of bacteria to produce isopentenol, a compound with desirable gasoline properties. The finding is a significant step toward developing a bacterial strain that can yield industrial quantities of renewable bio-gasoline.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1qrmeG4

via IFTTT

Jet-fueled electricity at room temperature: Fuel cell can run without high heat

Engineers have now developed the first room-temperature fuel cell that uses enzymes to help jet fuel produce electricity without needing to ignite the fuel. These new fuel cells can be used to power portable electronics, off-grid power and sensors.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/1tLMzE3

via IFTTT

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

High-speed 'label-free' imaging could reveal dangerous plaques

Researchers are close to commercializing a new type of medical imaging technology that could diagnose cardiovascular disease by measuring ultrasound signals from molecules exposed to a fast-pulsing laser.



from Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily http://ift.tt/13HBFoN

via IFTTT