Saturday, June 24, 2017

Self-folding origami: Chemical programming allows Nafion sheets to fold and refold

Plastic with a thousand faces: A single piece of Nafion foil makes it possible to produce a broad palette of complex 3-D structures. Researchers now describe how they use simple chemical 'programming' to induce the foil to fold itself using origami and kirigami principles. These folds can be repeatedly 'erased' and the foil can be 'reprogrammed'.

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Friday, June 23, 2017

Making ferromagnets stronger by adding non-magnetic elements

Magnetic materials can be functionalized through a thoroughly unlikely method, report researchers: by adding amounts of the virtually non-magnetic element scandium to a gadolinium-germanium alloy.

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Rhodium-based catalyst for making organosilicon using less precious metal

A new catalyst composed of silica, a rhodium complex and tertiary amines, significantly boosts hydrosilylation reactions, report researchers.

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The rise of giant viruses

Giant viruses acquire genes piecemeal from others, researchers have found. The discovery has implications for bioenergy production and environmental cleanup.

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State-of-the-art text mining technologies for chemistry

The first exhaustive revision of the state-of-the-art methodologies underlying chemical search engines, named entity recognition and text mining systems, has now been published by researchers.

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How a single chemical bond balances cells between life and death

With SLAC's X-ray laser and synchrotron, scientists measured exactly how much energy goes into keeping a crucial chemical bond from triggering a cell's death spiral.

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A unique amino acid for brain cancer therapy

Photodynamic therapy is often used to treat brain tumors because of its specificity — it can target very small regions containing cancerous cells while sparing the normal cells around it from damage. It works by injecting a drug called a photosensitizer into the bloodstream, where it gathers in cells, and then exposing the drug-filled cells to light. When the photosensitizer is exposed to this light, it emits what is known as a reactive oxygen species (ROS) that causes the cells to die.

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