Sunday, January 21, 2018

A step toward ridding register receipts of BPA

Although the US and other countries have banned or restricted the use of bisphenol A (BPA) because of environmental and health concerns, it is still used in thermally printed receipts and labels. Now researchers report in a new study that they have developed potentially safer polymers that could replace BPA for printed papers.

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Saturday, January 20, 2018

Microwaves could be as bad for the environment as cars suggests new research

Microwaves usage across the EU alone emits as much carbon dioxide as nearly seven million cars according to a new study. Researchers have carried out the first ever comprehensive study of the environmental impacts of microwaves, considering their whole life cycle, from 'cradle to grave.'

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Friday, January 19, 2018

Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sediments

More than seven years after Pennsylvania officials requested that the disposal of radium-laden fracking wastewater into surface waters be restricted, a new study finds that high levels of radioactivity persist in stream sediments at three disposal sites. Radioactivity at these sites is 650 times higher than at unaffected sites upstream. The contamination comes from conventional, or non-fracked, oil and gas wastewater, which, under current state regulations, can still be treated and discharged into streams.

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New input for quantum simulations

Researchers have devised new methods to create interesting input states for quantum computations and simulations. The new methods can be used to simulate certain electronic systems to arbitrarily high accuracy.

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Thursday, January 18, 2018

Method uses DNA, nanoparticles and lithography to make optically active structures

Researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could lead to light bending and cloaking devices -- news to make the ears of Star Trek's Spock perk up. Using DNA as a key tool, the scientists took gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes and arranged them in two and three dimensions to form optically active superlattices. The structures could be programmed to exhibit almost any color across the visible spectrum.

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AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria

An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs. This discovery was aided by Eve, an artificially intelligent 'robot scientist.'

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Coupling experiments to theory to build a better battery

Researchers has reported that a new lithium-sulfur battery component allows a doubling in capacity compared to a conventional lithium-sulfur battery, even after more than 100 charge cycles.

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